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Abstracts

THE BOOK OF ABSTRACTS

Dear Colleagues,
We are pleased to present you the Book of Abstracts. They are all worth your attention and reflection!

How to use the Book of Abstracts?

In three categories: Papers, Symposia and Posters, we present all abstracts that received positive reviews and have been accepted for presentation during the conference.

We organized the abstracts in alphabetical order. Looking for a specific abstract please look up the surname of the author who appeared first in the authors’ list. Other authors are presented in the content of the abstract.

We also ask you to take a moment to read the abstracts of our keynote speakers' presentations (see HOME page)

We wish you pleasant reading and cordially invite you to listen to and discuss all the presentations during the conference!

On behalf of the Local Conference Organizing Committee,
Maria Mendel

PAPERS
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  • Audrey Addi-Raccah, Noa Tamir, Tel Aviv University, Israel; Paola Dusi, Verona University, Italy;

    What can we learn about research on parental involvement? A review of leading academic Journals

  • Audrey Addi-Raccah, Tel Aviv University, Israel; Yael Grinshtain, Tel-Hay Collage and Israeli Open University, Israel;

    Teachers’ professionalism and relations with parents:Teachers' andparents' views

  • Beata Adrjan, Faculty of Social Science, University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Poland;

    Parent’s places (non – places?) at school – ethnographic analysis of parents’ evenings

  • M. Akkermans-Rutgers, Hanze University of Applied Sciences and the University of Groningen; R. Bosker, Groningen Institute for Educational Research (GION), University of Groningen, Netherlands; A. Kassenberg, J. Doornenbal, Integrated Youth Policy at the Hanze University of Applied Sciences, Netherlands; S. Doolaard, Groningen Institute for Educational Research (GION), Netherlands;

    Children, Parents, and Literacy Assignments. A Multifaceted Trinity of Interaction

  • Anu Alanko, University of Oulu, Finland;

    DIGITAL GOVERNANCE - EXPLORING PUPILS’ EXPERIENCES ON DIGITIZED HOME-SCHOOL COOPERATION

  • Anu Alanko, Outi Autti, Unn-Doris Baeck, University of Oulu, Finland & University of Tromsø , The Arctic University of Norway;

    Remoteness - a challenge for home-school cooperation?

  • Martha Allexsaht-Snider, Mehtap Kirmaci, Cristina Valencia Mazzanti, University of Georgia, USA; Elif Karsli Calamak, University of South Carolina, USA;

    Global perspectives on education and migration: Designing dialogic, equitable, and inclusive spaces for family engagement

  • Tahani Mohammed Alsaeid, School of Education (Early Childhood Research Centre), Roehampton University;

    Attitudes to Parental Involvement in Preschool in Saudi Arabia: A parental perspective (with specific reference to mothers and female guardians)

  • Bartosz Atroszko, University of Gdańsk, Faculty of Social Sciences, Poland;

    Parents of students - the barrier of educational change or the change agent?

  • Lucyna Bakiera, Department of Psychology of Human Development and Family Studies, Institute of Psychology, Adam Mickiewicz Uniwersity in Poznań, Poland;

    How to measure parental involvement?

  • Marcin Boryczko, University of Gdańsk, Poland;

    Ethical challenges in researching minors and youth with refugee experience and the role of parents in the research process. An example of 1.5 Generation research.

  • Laid Bouakaz, Malmö University, Sweden;

    Supplementary schools. Complementary or rival for mainstream schools in Sweden.

  • Agnieszka Bzymek, Ateneum High School in Gdańsk, Poland;

    Education and Social Engagement as a Power. Resilience in the Seniors Biography Narratives

  • Stefano Castelli, Department of Psychology, Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Italy;

    Teaching in the Time of the Internet. A Case Study from Italy

  • Barbara Chojnacka-Synaszko, Department of Social Pedagogy and Intercultural Education, Faculty of Ethnology and Educational Sciences, Silesia University in Katowice, Cieszyn, Poland;

    A parent engaging, or a parent engaged by a teacher in school education of a child at a younger school age

  • Anna Ciepielewska-Kowalik, Institute of Political Studies, Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland;

    Parents in primary schools. Co-production and co-creation as innovative tools of democratization education policy in Poland

  • Gill Crozier, University of Roehampton, United Kingdom;

    High Stakes, High Risks in the Parent-School Relationship. A discussion of parent-school relationships and the expenditure of labour, with reference to marginalised groups.

  • Eleni Damianidou, Helen Phtiaka, University of Cyprus, Cyprus;

    PARENTS AS STUDENTS: FINDING THE BALANCE

  • Rollande Deslandes, Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Canada; Sylvie Barma, Université Laval, Québec, Canada;

    Collaborative School-Family (S-F) Relationships using the Expansive Learning Cycle to Enhance Parents Empowering in Helping their Child in Literacy

  • Asnat Dor, Emek Yezreel Academic College, Israel;

    The Individualized Education Program: Do teachers and parents collaborate?

  • Paola Dusi, University of Verona, Department of Human Sciences, Italy;

    The school-family relationship in primary education. Parents’ perspectives in the age of the minimal self

  • Mana Ece Tuna, Gizem Solmaz, TED University, Turkey; Elif Karslı Çalamak, University of South Carolina, USA; Martha Allexsaht-Snider, University of Georgia, USA;

    Refugee Children’s Educational Journeys Elicited in Multilingual Family Math Workshops

  • Eleftheriadou Dimitra, PhD candidate, Department of Special Education, University of Thessaly, Volos, Greece; Vlachou Anastasia, Professor, Department of Special Education, University of Thessaly, Volos, Greece;

    Effective Communities of Practice regarding the education of students with learning disabilities in mainstream settings: an empirical study.

  • Arve Fiskerstrand, Volda University College, Norway;

    Understanding and implementation of parental involvement in Norwegian educational policy and practice field - and further effect on motivation and achievement in mathematics learning

  • Tânia de Freitas Resende, Priscila de Oliveira Coutinho, Maria Alice Nogueira, Mona Lisa de Moraes de Freitas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (Federal University of Minas Gerais) - Faculdade de Educação (Educational School), Brazil;

    When engagement becomes “colonization”: parental involvement in a Brazilian public school and the challenges to democratic management.

  • Susanne Garvis, Professor, University of Gothenburg, Heidi Harju-Luukkainen, Professor, University of Nord, Alicia R. Sadownik, Associate professor, Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Kindergarten Knowledge Centre for Systemic Research and Sustainable Futures, Michelle Bramley, Lecturer, Nottingham Trent University, Wendy Goff, Lecturer, Swinburne University of Technology, Emely Knör, Master student, University of Education, Weingarten, Ewa Lewandowska, The Maria Grzegorzewska University, Trish Lewis, PhD, Senior Lecturer, University of Canterbury, Sivanes Phillipson, Professor, Swinburne University of Technology, Gaye Tyler-Merrick, PhD, Senior Lecturer, Nottingham Trent University, Tina E. Yngvesson, Master student, University of Gothenburg,

    Steering documents as conditions for parental involvement. How to deal with the democratic deficit in Nordic, Anglo-Saxon and German countries?

  • M.A. Gomila, B. Pascual, L. Ballester, R. Pozo, University of Balearic Islands, Spain, Social and educational training and research Group (GIFES);

    The impact of the implementation of an evidence-based prevention family program at schools on the family-school-community links.

  • Enrique G. Gordillo, Diandra Rendón-Quevedo, Universidad Católica San Pablo, Arequipa, Perú;

    Influence of parental involvement, family type, and environmental factors on Peruvian children's academic achievement. Review of literature

  • Yael Grinshtain, Tel-Hai College and the Open University of Israel; Irit Sasson, Tel-Hai College

    Implementing an Extended School Day Program at a Rural School: The Parents' Perspective

  • Huifen Gu, Longhutang Experimental School of Xinbei District, Changzhou City, China; Jiacheng Li, Shanghai Municipal Institute for Lifelong Education, East China Normal University, Shanghai, China;

    Developing a Learning Neighborhood to Support the Students and Parents’ Learning in Winter Break: A Case Study from China

  • Huifen Gu, Longhutang Experimental School of Xinbei District, Changzhou City, China; Jiacheng Li, Shanghai Municipal Institute for Lifelong Education, East China Normal University, Shanghai;

    Developing the Novice Teacher’s Capacity of Collaborating with Parents: A Case Study from a Chinese Primary School

  • Limin Gu, Department of Education, Umeå University, Sweden;

    Preparing teachers for family-school cooperation: a Swedish perspective

  • Hsiu-Zu Ho, Rong Yang, Yin Yu, Hui-Ju Pai, Sookyung Yeon, Gevirtz Graduate School of Education, University of California, Santa Barbara, USA; Yeana W. Lam, University of California, Education Abroad Program, USA;

    Parenting Role Beliefs: Multiple Perspectives from a Suburban Chinese Classroom

  • Hsiu-Zu Ho, Faculty of Education, East China Normal University, East China;

    The Impact of Course Bank on Children's Education by Improving Parents'Scientific Literacy. Take a 50-year-old community-family cooperation in Shanghai as an example

  • Jiale Huang, East China normal university, EastChina;

    Research on the Relation between Parent Participation, Self-education Expectation and Academic Achievement Based on Structural Equation Model——A Case of China

  • Dorota Jaworska, Institute of Education, University of Gdańsk, Poland;

    Development of Immigrant Parents School Engagement in the perspective of Immigrant Integration City Policy in Gdańsk

  • Li Jiacheng, Shanghai Lifelong Education Research Institute, East China Normal University, Shanghai, China; Li Wenshu, East China Normal University, Shanghai, China; Other members of the research project: YangYang, Xu Wenyue, Lv keyi, Li Yan, Qin Hongmei, Qin Yan.;

    The effectiveness, dilemma and development of home-school cooperation in school safety education. An experimental research in China

  • Kirsten Johansen Horrigmo, Jorunn H. Midtsundstad, University of Agder;

    How does the connections between families, school and local society facilitate inclusion?

  • Kristín Jónsdóttir, School of Education, University of Iceland, Iceland;

    Effects of GDPR on parental involvement. A study of Icelandic compulsory schools

  • Marta Jurczyk, University of Gdańsk, Poland;

    Supporting sexuality of people with intellectual disabilities - dimensions of being a participating parent

  • K. Kayon Morgan, University of Denver, United States of America, USA;

    “We’re supposed to be a team”. Co-constructing family engagement in schools to prepare students for postsecondary readiness

  • Alex Kendall, Caroline Montgomery, Mary-Rose Puttick, Louise Wheatcroft, Dave Harte, Birmingham City University, Andreas Koskeris, Evangelia Boufardea, Catherine Christodoulopoulou, Institouto Technologias Ypologistonkai Ekdoseon Diofantos; Christian Reimers, Laura Raucher, Bildung Online; Khursedai Homid, Lisa Sperling, Thomas Köhler, Technische Universität Dresden; Anna Zakou, Ellinogermaniki Agogi; Eszter Salamon, Luca László, Brigitte Haider, Parents International;

    Opening School Doors: Engaging migrant parents using social media and technology

  • Chrysa Keung, Centre for University & School Partnership, Faculty of Education, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, China; Alan Cheung, Department of Educational Administration & Policy, Faculty of Education, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, China;

    Promoting effective play-based learning in kindergartens: A holistic approach

  • Lyu Keyi, Lyu Cong, Department of Education, East China Normal University, Shanghai, China; Li Jiacheng, Shanghai Municipal Institute for Lifelong Education, Shanghai, China;

    Parental Involvement Contributes on Family Cultural Capital. Based on Taoyuan Private Primary School in J District in Shanghai

  • Kathy Kikis-Papadakis, Fotini Haimala, Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas; Aristides Protopsaltis, Antonia Schorer, Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen Nuernberg; Nikolina Nikolova, Sofiiski Universitet Sveti Kliment Ohridski; Olga Firssova, Open Universiteir Nederland; Mario Barajas, Universitat De Barcelona; Eszter Salamon, Parents International;

    Overcoming the impact of parental gender bias and parents’ previous experiences on STEM teaching

  • Mehtap Kirmaci, Martha Allexsaht-Snider, University of Georgia, USA;

    A Dialogic Science Learning Community with Families and Teachers: “I was Always Afraid of Doing Something Wrong”

  • Joanna Kołodziejczyk, Jagiellonian University, Kraków, Poland; Bartłomiej Walczak, Uniwersytet Warszawski, Poland;

    What does the state know (and want to know) about parental participation?

  • Bernadetta Kosewska, Maria Grzegorzewska University, Poland; Pedagogical Therapy Department (Institute of Special Education);

    Parental support in the development of a small child with normal development, with a disability, and disabled. Comparative study

  • Agnieszka Kossowska, Opole Technical University, Poland; School - a communication minefield. Parents of children with ASD as hostile or invisible participants in the education

  • Agnieszka Kossowska, Opole Technical University, Poland; Patrycja Łaga, University of Gdańsk, Poland;

    Activities for social change - the voice of parents

  • Piotr Kowzan, Iwona Świdlińska, University of Gdansk, Poland;

    Parental Reasons Behind Children's Participation in Street Protests

  • Niels Kryger, The Danish School of Education, Aarhus University, Denmark; Allan Westerling, Roskilde University, Denmark;

    Data of the ‘objectified child’ as a co-actor in the cooperation between parents and professionals in Danish daycare

  • Katarzyna Kurzyca, Association for Education and Family „Węgielek”;

    „All the world’s a stage...” - parents’ roles in an educational act of children

  • Joanne Lehrer, Véronique Menand, Department of Educational Sciences, University of Quebec in Outaouais, Quebec, Canada; Stéphanie Duval, Department of Studies on Teaching and Learning, Laval University, Quebec, Canada;

    Organizing a transition activity: Narrative of a mother in childcare

  • Cong Lyu, Keyi Lyu, Department of Education, East China Normal University, Shanghai, China; Lanian Cheng, Minhang District Private Shuangjiang Primary School, Shanghai, China; Jiacheng Li, Shanghai Municipal Institute for Lifelong Education, Shanghai, China;

    Making the Learning Happen by the Parent-Child Reading Program: A Study in a Migrant School in Shanghai, China

  • Benjamin Malczyk, Department of Social Work, University of Nebraska at Kearney, USA;

    Family Routines Matter: Examining the Interaction of Family Structure, Family Routines and School Engagement

  • Raquel-Amaya Martínez-González, Mª Teresa Iglesias-García, Beatriz Rodríguez-Ruiz, Department of Educational Sciences, University of Oviedo, Spain;

    The need to support positive parenting with parents of teenagers. Implications for schools and communities

  • Alexei Medvedev, KWB Koordinierungsstelle Weiterbildung und Beschäftigung e. V., House of Commerce, Hamburg, Germany;

    Sustainability of school-based parent projects: Lessons learnt from the evaluation of the project Schulmentoren (2014 - 2020)

  • Maria Mersini Pananaki, Department of Education, Stockholm University, Sweden;

    The parent-teacher relationship-a social practice in an institutional setting

  • Monica Miller Marsh, Kent State University Child Development Center, USA; Lola Raimbekova, Mustary Mariyam, Kent State University, USA;

    Building A Culturally Responsive Framework for School Engagement with Immigrant Parents

  • Waliah Musoke, Independent researcher, London, United Kingdom;

    The educational strategies of Black Ugandan British parents in England

  • Andrea Nickel-Schwäbisch, Lutheran University of Applied Science, Germany;

    Language and violence: theory for practice based research about parents in education

  • E.Nihal Lindberg, Kastamonu University Department of Educational Sciences, Turkey; Pinar Guven, Kastamonu University Education Faculty, Turkey;

    Academic Expectations, Parental Involvement, Family Income, Parents’ Education Level as Predictors of Child Achievement

  • Margaret O'Connell Hanna, School of Education, University of Michigan, USA;

    Learning from the Community-Engaged Practices of a “Kid Success” Neighborhood

  • Bukola Oyinloye, The Open University, United Kingdom;

    “I still don’t understand…”: Photo-elicitation and parents in rural communities in North Central Nigeria

  • Hui-Ju Pai, Providence University, Taichung City, Taiwan, China; Hsiu-Zu Ho, Gevirtz Graduate School of Education, University of California, Santa Barbara, USA; Yeana W. Lam, University of California Education Abroad Program, USA;

    A Case Study of a Tutoring Program as Catalyst for Strengthening Family-School-Community Partnerships in the Atayal Indigenous Tribe in Taiwan

  • Pinelopi Patrika, University of Thessaly, Department of Special Education, Greece; Anastasia Vlachou, University of Thessaly, Department of Special Education, Greece;

    Relations between professionals and mothers of children with developmental disabilities: the voices of mothers.

  • Dorien Petri, Margreet Luinge, Annelies Kassenberg;

    Teachers, parents, and children about cooperation in bullying

  • Helen Phtiaka, Sociology of Education & Inclusive Education, University of Cyprus, Cyprus; Giorgos Konstantinidis, Primary teacher;

    Parenting a child with disability in the Greek-Cypriot context: possibilities and constraints according to the experience of fifteen fathers

  • Martyna Pilas, University of Gdańsk, Poland; Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Education;

    Tripartite school conflicts and non-consensual democracy. An attempt of autoethnographic analysis.

  • Łukasz Remisiewicz, Institute of Philosophy, Sociology and Journalism, University of Gdańsk, Poland;

    Interaction Ritual Chains Approach to Transferring Children’s Knowledge between School and Family

  • Elizabeth Rouse, Deakin University, Australia;

    Teachers working in hospitals – what do partnerships look like?

  • Elizabeth Rouse, Deakin University, Australia; Fay Hadley, Macquarie University, Australia;

    Examining parent partnerships in early childhood settings from multiple stakeholders - Listening to parents, educators, teachers, directors and principals

  • Sandra Ryan, Mary Immaculate College, Limerick, Ireland;

    Tracking Pre-service Teacher Attitudes to and Sense of Efficacy in Relation to Family Engagement

  • Alicja R. Sadownik, Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway; Kindergarten Knowledge Center for Systemic Research and Sustainable Futures ;

    Cake as a manifestation of (the lack of) family agency in the context of (pre)school

  • Maria Fernanda dos Santos Martins, Departament of Social Sciences of Education, Institute of Education, University of Minho, Portugal;

    School websites and parents: a new interaction reality?

  • Paweł Seroka, Ateneum – University in Gdansk, Poland;

    How to be a better parent than the one I had? "Good" parenthood in the era of late modernity - an analysis of a single biography

  • Chrysa Keung, Centre for University & School Partnership, Faculty of Education, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, China; Angela Siu, Department of Educational Psychology, Faculty of Education, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, China;

    Intracultural differences in parental beliefs and practices toward children’s play

  • Barbara Smolińska-Theiss, Anna Górka-Strzałkowska, Maria Grzegorzewska University, Warsaw, Poland;

    Parent - difficult partner for the teacher. From the research on an innovative project in the school in Ursynów

  • Talitha Stam, Renske Keizer, Nicole Lucassen, Roel van Steensel, Brian Godor, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Netherlands; Mariette Lusse, Hogeschool Rotterdam, Netherlands;

    The role of Parent Involvement Workers to increase both home-based and school-based parental involvement in a disadvantage neighbourhood in Rotterdam

  • Bonnie L. Stelmach, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada;

    Rural, secondary school parents’ sense of community: Insights from Alberta, Canada

  • Monique Strijk, Rotterdam University of Applied Sciences, Netherlands; Mariëtte Lusse, Erik van Schooten, Ellen Klatter, Rotterdam University of Applied Sciences, Netherlands; Marinka Kuijpers, Open University, Netherlands;

    Predicting Career-specific Parental Behaviour

  • Mirjam Stroetinga, Marnix University for Applied Sciences, Utrecht, Netherlands;

    Primary school teachers’ practices of and thinking about collaborating with parents on upbringing

  • Przemysław Szczygieł, ATENEUM - Szkoła Wyższa w Gdańsku, Poland;

    Protesting parents as a significant social and educational phenomenon. Andragogical inspirations

  • Luminita Todea, Univertsitatea Tehnica Cluj-Napoca; Eszter Salamon, Luca László, Parents International;

    Successful mentoring model approaches to support vulnerable parents for better learning outcomes of children

  • Chrysoula Tsirmpa, Nektarios Stellakis, Department of Educational Science and Early Childhood Education, University of Patras, Greece;

    Family literacy practices and investigation of factors, that are relevant and should be taken into account in the cooperation of educators and parents

  • Danuta Uryga, Department of Education Policy, Maria Grzegorzewska University, Warsaw, Poland;

    Polish parental grass-root movement as a struggle for recognition of LGBT+ youth and children

  • Cristina Valencia Mazzanti, Martha Allexsaht-Snider, University of Georgia, USA;

    Learning from Creating Spaces for Family Engagement with a Focus on Linguistic Diversity

  • René Veenstra, Gijs Huitsing, University of Groningen, Sociology, Netherlands; Annelies Kassenberg, Gabriëlla Dekker-Calado, Hanze University of Applied Sciences, Youth, Education and Society, Netherlands; Martijn Willemse, Windesheim University of Applied Sciences, Cooperation with Parents in Education, Netherlands;

    Combatting bullying: How can competing become cooperating and when do parents want to be involved in the fight?

  • Adrijana Visnjic Jevtić, University of Zagreb, OMEP, Croatia; Ewa Lewandowska, Maria Grzegorzewska University, OMEP, Poland; Alicja R. Sadownik, Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Norway; Kindergarten Knowledge Centre for Systemic Research and Sustainable Futures;

    Conditions for parental involvement in early childhood education: Croatian, Norwegian, and Polish ECE steering documents and teacher education curricula

  • Tuula Vuorinen, Department of Education, Culture and Communication, Mälardalens University, Västerås, Sweden;

    “It´s pretty much about attitudes …”: parents view on building teams with preschool practitioners

  • Britt-Evy Westergard, Gerd Hilde Lunde, Oslo Metropolitan University; Kathy Kikis-Papadakis, Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas; Bianka Winterscheid, Internationaler Bund Südwest; Mikael Carlsen, Center for Specialpaedagogiske Boernetilbud; Vasilis Kalopisis, Social Enterprise Puzzle; Eszter Salamon, Parents International;

    Supporting parents of children with intellectual disabilities by online training for inclusion

  • Marta Wiatr, Department of Social Pedagogy, Maria Grzegorzewska University, Warsaw, Poland;

    The Ambiguous Meanings of Parental Engagement in the Reflexive Modernization Era: Parental Educational Initiatives in Poland

  • Suzanne Wilson, University of Central Lancashire Westlakes Campus, Samuel Lindow Building, United Kingdom;

    ‘Hard to Reach’ Parents but not Hard to Research: A Critical Reflection of Gatekeeper Positionality in a Community Based Methodology

  • Maria A. Wolf, University of Innsbruck, Austria; Institute of Educational Sciences;

    Gendered Notions of „Good“ Parents. Good Parent discourses in educational journals.

  • Kartika Yulianti, Eddie Denessen, Mienke Droop, Gert-Jan Veerman, Radboud University, Netherlands;

    The effects of transformational leadership and teacher invitations on parental involvement: A study in elementary schools in Java, Indonesia

  • Alicja Zbierzchowska, Institute of Education, University of Gdańsk, Poland;

    Support for underage mothers in the school environment. The perspective of school staff in Poland

  • SYMPOSIA
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  • 1. (Dis)Empowering Migrant Parents in Nordic Education and Social Work
  • 2. From Concepts to Evaluation of School-Family-Communities Partnerships Considering Diverse Actors
  • 3. Re-Constructing the ‘Good’ Parent: Co-operation, Intensification, Contestation
  • 4. Teachers Involving Parents in Schoolwork and School Transitions
  • POSTERS
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  • Maria Trzcińska-Król, Department of Methodology and Pedagogy of Creativity, Laboratory of Information Technology for Education, Maria Grzegorzewska University, Warsaw, Poland;

    Cooperation Between Teachers and Parents of Foreign Students

  • Kitlyn Tjin A Djie, Bureau Beschermjassen, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; Spark L. van Beurden, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands;

    How Families and Professionals form Learning Communities for Empowerment and Diversity: An action research-based work model

  • Ewa Włodarczyk, Faculty of Educational Studies, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Poland;

    Mothers addicted to alcohol in the process of re-learning the role of mother

  • Yin Yu, Hsiu-Zu Ho, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA, USA;

    Parenting Styles: Unique Links to Taiwanese Adolescent Mental Health and Academic Performance

  • SUBMISSION TIMETABLE

    10 September 2018

    Abstract submissions open

    24 March 2019

    Abstract submissions close

    31 March 2019

    Decisions on abstracts

    How to Submit an Abstract for a PAPER SESSION

    Submission of proposals opens between September 10th 2018 and 24th March 2019. The paper proposal must be sent by email to ernape-pl@ug.edu.pl indicating that it is a proposal for ERNAPE-Gdańsk2019 and that it is a paper proposal.

    Paper sessions consist of oral presentations that last 15 minutes followed by 5 minutes for questions – 20 minutes in total for each paper. Paper presentations will be scheduled in 90 minute sessions which will normally include 4 papers on similar topics (in sessions with 3 papers, the time for each paper will be 25 minutes). There will be a chairperson for each session who will manage the time and questions.

      The abstract should be a maximum of 350 words + references (maximum 10) and include the following:
    • Title of proposal
    • Key words (maximum of 5) reflecting the topic/theme of your submission, so that the paper can be placed in the most appropriate session
    • General description, research questions, objectives, theoretical framework, rationale
    • Methods/methodology (if applicable)
    • Research findings and or conclusions
    • References
    • Please submit names of all authors/contributors, affiliations and email addresses on a separate page, together with the paper title. Please specify who will be presenting.

      Please make sure that the quality of your abstract is good, since if accepted, it will be published in the book of abstracts on-line and in print. The conference language is English and all abstracts must be in English (the quality of English language must be of a high standard).

      When submitting an abstract the author must specify key words clearly indicating the topic of concern. The organising committee will assign the papers to a relevant session according to the best fit of papers indicated by the key words. The authors will receive a decision on their abstract by 31 March 2019.

    How to Submit an Abstract for a SYMPOSIUM

    Submission of proposals opens between September 10th 2018 and 24th March 2019.

    A symposium session builds on a common theme and should be proposed and planned by a symposium convener. The papers must focus on the identified theme. A symposium has a chair (often the convener) and a discussant, who reads the papers in advance and comments on them. The symposium convener will decide how the symposium is to be organised and the time allocated for each presentation. Symposia consist of a 90 minute session organised by the proposers. The symposia include 3 – 5 papers per session plus a discussant.

    The symposium proposal must be sent by email to ernape-pl@ug.edu.pl indicating that it is a proposal for ERNAPE-Gdańsk2019 and that it is a symposium proposal.

      The abstract proposal for a symposium must also include:
    • The title of the symposium, and (2) An abstract describing the entire symposium (500 words)
    • Keywords indicating the theme/• s of the symposium.
    • Names of the chairperson and discussant for the Symposium. THESE SHOULD BE SUBMITTED ON AN ADDITIONAL BUT SEPARATE PAGE TOGETHER WITH THE SYMPOSIUM TITLE
    • Short abstracts (200 words) of all papers within the symposium including the titles of their presentations, key words (maximum of 5) reflecting the topic/theme of your submission, so that the paper can be placed in the most appropriate session; general description, research questions, objectives, theoretical framework, rationale; methods/methodology (if applicable); research findings and or conclusions; references.
    • Names of each contributor along with their affiliation and email address, must be specified ON A SEPARATE SHEET INCLUDING THE TITLE OF THEIR ABSTRACT AND THE TITLE OF THE SYMPOSIUM.

    The symposium proposal needs to be sent as one submission with a description of the symposium (as indicated above) and all of the abstracts for all papers linked to it. The proposer must appoint a chairperson and a discussant and these must be named in the proposal. The discussant’s role is to read all abstracts ahead of the symposium and offer a critique of the symposium as a whole. By 1 August 2019 the proposer therefore needs to provide the discussant with a full set of abstracts of papers within the symposium. The proposer is responsible for communicating with all contributors and with ERNAPEGdańsk2019 about the proposal. Only the person who submits the proposal will receive correspondence relating to the submission. The proposer must notify all authors of the status of the proposal. The proposer will receive a decision on their abstract by 31 March 2019. Please make sure the names and titles (of overall symposium and individual contributing papers) are on separate pages to facilitate the anonymous reviewing process, as explained in the general proposal information. Please make sure that the quality of your abstract is good, since if accepted, it will be published in the book of abstracts on-line and in print. The conference language is English and all abstracts must be in English (the quality of English language must be of a high standard).

    How to Submit an Abstract for a POSTER SESSION

    Submission of proposals opens between September 10th 2018 and 24th March 2019.

    The poster proposal must be sent by email to ernape-pl@ug.edu.pl indicating that it is a proposal for ERNAPE-Gdańsk2019 and that it is a poster proposal.

    Posters are graphical presentations which will be displayed during the whole conference and presented in a special Poster Session. Presenters will be asked to be available at the Poster Session to answer questions from other conference delegates. Posters should be prepared for the Conference in A1/portrait (upright).

      The abstract should be a maximum of 350 words including the following:
    • Title of proposal
    • The topic/theme of the poster and research upon which it is based.
    • General description, research questions, objectives, theoretical framework, rationale.
    • Methods/methodology (if applicable).
    • Research findings and or conclusions.
    • References
    • Please submit names of all authors/contributors, affiliations and email addresses on a separate page, together with the poster title.

      The conference language is English and all presentations must be in English (the quality of English language must be of a high standard).

      The authors will receive a decision on their abstract by 31 March 2019.

    Contact

    12th Biennial Conference of the European Research Network About Parents in Education (ERNAPE), 18-20 September 2019

    UNIVERSITY OF GDAŃSK, FACULTY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES

    Gdańsk, Bażyńskiego street, no. 4